Superior Court Offenses

New Jersey Criminal Attorney Handling Superior Court Matters and Indictable Offenses

New Jersey’s court system is broken down into Municipal and Superior Court. Municipal courts hear cases which involve disorderly persons and petty disorderly person offenses. Matters resolved in municipal court are not brought before a grand jury and are decided by a judge rather than a jury of your peers. Superior courts hear cases which are more serious in nature. Such matters are called “indictable offenses.” An indictable offense is equivalent to a felony in other states. You may serve mandatory time in state prison and have a permanent criminal record if you are found guilty of an indictable offense. Such cases are the most serious that a person may face in New Jersey. Take immediate action if you have been arrested. Call our office today and have your case evaluated for free.

New Jersey attorney defending first, second and third degree indictable offenses

Indictable offenses are broken into four categories. First degree offenses are the most severe charges possible and are reserved for cases involving murder, manslaughter, robbery, and rape. These offenses involve extended or lifetime penalties. Fourth degree offenses are the least serious of the indictable offenses but are still taken very seriously. Second and third degree offenses range between these two.

John is an aggressive trial attorney who has been practicing law since the 1990’s. John is a former deputy public defender who possesses the experience and knowledge required to handle the most serious crimes. Some of the cases John has successfully defended include:

If you have been arrested for any of the above offenses, your freedom is at risk. Contacting a qualified New Jersey attorney as soon as possible is the best way to help your case. Call or email us today to get started right away.

New Jersey attorney providing counsel throughout the legal process

The superior court system is complex. If you have been arrested for an indictable crime then there will be many steps in the process. Once you have been arrested, the prosecutor will present its case to a grand jury. The grand jury is a panel of people who will listen to the facts and decide if the prosecution will be permitted to bring criminal charges against you. A formal indictment will be handed down if the grand jury believes that sufficient evidence exists to justify the charges. At your initial arraignment, you will most likely enter a plea of not guilty, indicate which motions will be filed, and otherwise indicate that you will fight the case until john can either negotiate the case, or the case actually goes to trial. John will help you understand your legal options and provide you with a realistic evaluation on the strength of your case as well as the strength of the prosecution’s evidence against you. John is an aggressive and honest litigator, and is “up front” with his clients. He provides unbiased, realistic advice. He will neither try to scare you, nor will he give you false expectations. Call to meet John today, and receive a free case evaluation.